Internal Competition Rules and Guidance for 2022


Use this link to See the 2022 Internal Competition Rules, Scoring and Categories

Competitions


Internal Competition Dates for 2022

Submission pages for all competitions are open in PhotoEntry

Date Event Subject Closing Date for Entries Judge

January 24

1st Quarterly Competition

Open

Midnight Sunday, January 16

Keith Barber CPAGB LRPS FISCT

February 21
Themed Competition
"Strictly mono"
Midday Monday, February 21
Members
March 28
Images Appraisal
Members' images
Sunday, March 27
Images reviewed and discussed by Members

April 25

2nd Quarterly Competition

Open

Midnight Sunday, April 24

Nick Berentzen

May 23
Themed Competition
"Should be an advert"
Midday Monday, May 23
Members
June 27
Images Appraisal
Members' images
Sunday, June 26
Images reviewed and discussed by Members

July 25

3rd Quarterly Competition

Open

Midnight Sunday, July 24

Mike Lawrence

August 22
Themed Competition
"Abandoned"
Midday Monday, August 22
Members
September 19
Images Appraisal
Members' images
Sunday, September 18
Images reviewed and discussed by Members

October 24

4th Quarterly Competition

Open

Midnight Sunday, October 23

tba

November 7

Chairman's Challenge

tba

Midday Monday, November 7

Nick Hilton

November 28
Themed Competition
"Emotions"
Midday Monday, November 28
Members
December 12
Images Appraisal
Members' images
Midday Monday, December 12
Images reviewed and discussed by Members


Internal Competition Rules and Guidance for 2022


Use this link to See the 2022 Internal Competition Rules, Scoring and Categories

Submitting Entries

How many to submit?

Members may submit FOUR DPIs [see rules relating to categories].

and

THREE prints to each competition.

When to submit?

Entries must be submitted within the timescale set out in the PhotoEntry submission page.

How to submit?

All submissions must be via the PhotoEntry website.


How to Resize DPIs

Having trouble sizing your DPIs? Then our tutorials will help.



14 Points to Keep Judges Happy

  1. Focus – If the image is a portrait it is vital that the eyes, or at least the nearest eye is|are in sharp focus. If it is a close-up of a flower some part should be in sharp focus.
  2. Over–sharpening – Don't try to compensate for poorly focused or soft images.
  3. Blown highlights – Be aware that these do not intrude, although there are some exceptions such as sun reflections on shiny surfaces and lights at night.
  4. Too tight cropping – Give the subject room to move into, or crop close in so there's no mistake as to what you intend.
  5. Make the picture look right – Even A slightly sloping field in the foreground of a landscape may make the viewer uncomfortable. You may also have a colour cast, so always view your prints under daylight conditions [your monitor and printer should be profiled].
  6. Bland areas – In landscapes in particular, don't leave in too much uninteresting sky or bland foreground.
  7. Crooked horizons – Water tends to find its own level, so show it that way.
  8. Irrelevant objects – Try not to include objects that do not add to the main subject of interest. Leave some out of focus detail just visible preferably, complimenting the main subject.
  9. HDR|tone mapping – Avoid excessive HDR|tone mapping.
  10. Light edge areas – Avoid light areas near the edges of the image. Judges tend to say these areas "draw the eye" away from the intended point of interest. Even if there aren't light areas near the edge, it is sometimes helpful to slightly darken the corners|edges with a soft-edged vignette; it shouldn't be obvious, don't overdo it.
  11. White borders around PDIs – The technique of adding a border may be useful where the image has a dark background and the edges would otherwise be ill-defined from the projector background. The border need only be one or two pixels wide and preferably of a mid-tone.
  12. Colour saturation – Don't be tempted to boost colour just to give more impact.
  13. Composition rules – The rule of thirds is a good guide, but remember it's only a guide, and has exceptions.
  14. De–spot – Remove any sensor dirt spots that are visible.